09/22/2017
Connect:

Education

 
William Sherman Coperthwaite, September 17, 1930 - November 26, 2013
 
William S. Coperthwaite, architect, author, maker, visionary social critic, and homesteader, has died.  My own family has lost both our sail and our anchor, and today there are thousands of Mainers and New Englanders who grieve the same loss.
 
A man who inspired many thousands by his life led close to nature and in opposition to contemporary society, Mr. Coperthwaite was often compared to Henry David Thoreau. Similar...
comments(0)

American foreign policy as a state sponsor of terrorism in response to terrorism operates now with a decidedly genocidal logic. Perhaps that logic has been there all along, but with increased American use of drone assassinations in tribal areas on two continents, the logic has become inescapably real, albeit not officially acknowledged or, perhaps, consciously...

comments(0)

“When I was in school, kids worked harder and were better behaved,” declared the young man just seven years out of high school. “Son, every generation says schools have gone to pieces since their day,” I replied. “A friend said his college professor colleagues were complaining about the ‘alarming’ degeneration. ‘Kids today don’t know how to write a clear sentence, lack knowledge of history and don’t even know when the Civil war occurred!’”

This widely held folk legend deserves a closer look. What are the facts?

The federal government just reported that Vermont, compared to all states and nations, ranked...

comments(0)
From 2003 until September 2011, Bill Keller was Times executive editor. Earlier he was a reporter and Washington bureau chief. He's now an op-ed columnist and Times Magazine contributor. His columns are best avoided. They shun truth and full disclosure. They avoid telling readers what they most need to know. Managed news misinformation substitutes. All of it fit to print isn't fit to read. It's typical Times journalism. Readers are cheated. They're betrayed. They deserve better. Growing millions seek it. Alternative media sources provide it. ...
comments(0)

On Oct. 21 Gov. Peter Shumlin Tweeted: “Congratulations to Luke Foley for winning the #VT Teacher of the Year Award!” Better late than never. Luke Foley was named Vermont Teacher of the Year nearly a week earlier, on Oct. 15. I was disappointed that Gov. Shumlin couldn’t make it nearly next door to Northfield Middle High School to congratulate Luke Foley in person — and demonstrate to the students filling the auditorium what an important even this was.

Shumlin’s schedule listed no commitments the day Foley received his award. Maybe Shumlin was resting up for his next day 7:30 a.m. appearance at the ribbon cutting for the new...

comments(0)
 
All wars are insane. World War I was particularly so. In this debacle of needless slaughter, soldiers were ordered to charge across open fields into the mouths of machine guns. Among the many great fiascos, the 1915 Gallipoli campaign stands out. Stymied with an entrenched and stalemated western front, the British threw hundreds of thousands of Empire troops against the Ottoman Turks. The aim was a land march up the Dardanelles ending in the capture of Istanbul. A half million casualties and eight months later, the British withdrew in total failure.
 
...
comments(0)

I was driving back from Amherst, Ma and stopped somewhere around Windsor, VT and noticed a headline in the Rutland Herald that said, “State Catches Heat for Yankee closing”.

The article could just have easily come from the Times Argus

“Angry Vernon residents blamed the state of Vermont Monday for the looming shutdown of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, two Vermont House committees were told…More than one Yankee employee said they didn’t want to leave Vermont, and they didn’t know where they...

comments(0)

Quick quiz from this independence-minded Vermont perfesser.

What’s the United States’ greatest gift to the world?

If you answered with the Declaration of Independence (all about “secession,” of course), the invention of the U.S. postal office (a few years after the first Vermont republic started delivering their own mail beginning in 1777), the national park idea, or really good beer, you are in the ballpark. The best answer, though, may be the invention of universal public education, something we do really well here in the once and future Republic of Vermont.

...

comments(0)

(This essay is an excerpt from the forthcoming book, “The Vermont Way: Restless Spirits and Popular Movements”.)

The idea of defying the forces of centralized power and wealth can be seductive, especially if you live in a small, isolated place with a reputation for being contrary and the sense that it’s different, even exceptional.
 
In Congress, Vermont’s Bernie Sanders has reflected this perspective, challenging corporate secrecy and the powers of international financial institutions by forging alliances that cross traditional lines. When that strategy was attempted in Vermont during the late...
comments(0)

Image by Dylan Kelley for Vermont Commons 

The latest high-ranking Vermont Democrat to push for prime military pork in her state is Burlington city attorney Eileen Blackwood, who released a slippery legal memo October 17th that is as cleverly political as it is narrowly legal, leading to widespread, obtuse media coverage along the lines of Vermont Public Radio's simply false headline: "City Report: Burlington Can't Block F-35."

Blackwood's "preliminary...

comments(0)

Pages

Subscribe to Education