07/26/2017
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Let me issue and control a nation‘s money and I care not who writes the laws.

– Amschel Rothschild

Perhaps the single most important thing to know about power in the world today is that most nations do not have control over their own currencies. Instead privately owned, for-profit central banks – such as the Federal Reserve Bank in the US – create money out of nothing and then loan it at interest to their respective governments. This is an incredibly profitable scam, but that’s not the worst of it.

Not only do the central banks have...

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American foreign policy as a state sponsor of terrorism in response to terrorism operates now with a decidedly genocidal logic. Perhaps that logic has been there all along, but with increased American use of drone assassinations in tribal areas on two continents, the logic has become inescapably real, albeit not officially acknowledged or, perhaps, consciously...

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Two events occurred recently that high-light the importance of presenting statistics when advocating for policy change . One was a presentation by Dr. Gus Speth and the other was the press conference held by Anthony Pollina, Gwen Hallsmith, and Gary Flomenhoft (of  the Gund Institute). We cannot move forward in any of our efforts unless the numbers make sense, and unless we keep reminding people of the overwhelming and obvious...

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Dear High Country News,

As a Vermonter who lived out West for 10 years in my twenties, I have been a loyal HCN subscriber since 1992 - excellent newspaper - and was pleased to read Krista Langlois' fine article about secession in your new issue. Since I was quoted a bit out of context, here are a few additional observations. I hope you will publish them.

1. Secession is every American's birthright - the concept drives Jefferson's 1776 Declaration of Independence and is woven into the fabric of U.S....

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“When I was in school, kids worked harder and were better behaved,” declared the young man just seven years out of high school. “Son, every generation says schools have gone to pieces since their day,” I replied. “A friend said his college professor colleagues were complaining about the ‘alarming’ degeneration. ‘Kids today don’t know how to write a clear sentence, lack knowledge of history and don’t even know when the Civil war occurred!’”

This widely held folk legend deserves a closer look. What are the facts?

The federal government just reported that Vermont, compared to all states and nations, ranked...

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Global security begins in Washington, where the secretary of defense says that American isolationism is a bigger threat to the rest of the world than American hubris and that's why "we must remain the world's only global leader." If that sounds confused and contradictory, it's only because that's who we are as a government in the early 21st century.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel spoke at length (35 minutes) about "America's long-term national security priorities" as the keynote speaker for the Global Security Forum 2013,...

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From 2003 until September 2011, Bill Keller was Times executive editor. Earlier he was a reporter and Washington bureau chief. He's now an op-ed columnist and Times Magazine contributor. His columns are best avoided. They shun truth and full disclosure. They avoid telling readers what they most need to know. Managed news misinformation substitutes. All of it fit to print isn't fit to read. It's typical Times journalism. Readers are cheated. They're betrayed. They deserve better. Growing millions seek it. Alternative media sources provide it. ...
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All wars are insane. World War I was particularly so. In this debacle of needless slaughter, soldiers were ordered to charge across open fields into the mouths of machine guns. Among the many great fiascos, the 1915 Gallipoli campaign stands out. Stymied with an entrenched and stalemated western front, the British threw hundreds of thousands of Empire troops against the Ottoman Turks. The aim was a land march up the Dardanelles ending in the capture of Istanbul. A half million casualties and eight months later, the British withdrew in total failure.
 
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(This essay is an excerpt from the forthcoming book, “The Vermont Way: Restless Spirits and Popular Movements”.)

The idea of defying the forces of centralized power and wealth can be seductive, especially if you live in a small, isolated place with a reputation for being contrary and the sense that it’s different, even exceptional.
 
In Congress, Vermont’s Bernie Sanders has reflected this perspective, challenging corporate secrecy and the powers of international financial institutions by forging alliances that cross traditional lines. When that strategy was attempted in Vermont during the late...
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The Fourth Amendment of the U. S. Constitution is anti-police-state

“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”  

The founding document of the United States is inherently suspicious of a government’s willingness to abuse its powers, a suspicion rooted in centuries of tyranny around...

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