08/21/2018
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The aggressive campaign against vaccine choice that continues this year despite the 133-6 house vote to keep our medical freedom of choice in 2012 reminds me why last year's anti-corporate personhood bill was so critical. It also reminds me of the story of Semmelweiss, a doctor who (in his day) was villified and committed to bedlam by experts who rejected his work on advocating for handwashing to prevent infection...

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Maybe it’s time we turned the shortage of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) political bloviations over to Mythbusters. We haven't heard this many anguished cries of alarm since Eisenhower and Sputnik. At least the 1958 National Defense Education Act resulted in a massive improvement in science textbooks and instruction – an approach with more promise than our current practice of importing indentured foreign workers.
 
The first step in busting the myth is to take a look at the federal government's Bureau of Labor Statistics projections of the...
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In something of a stealth maneuver during the 2012 holiday season, the U.S. Department of Energy set about to give every American a little more radiation exposure, and for some a lot, by allowing manufacturers to use radioactive metals in their consumer products – such as zippers, spoons, jewelry, belt buckles, toys, pots, pans, furnishings, ...

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The Vermont Commons News Cooperative is bringing Democracy School to Waitsfield May 4 and 5. Contact Rob Williams to get the details and sign up.

The Daniel Pennock Democracy School is a stimulating and illuminating course that teaches citizens and activists how to reframe exhausting and often discouraging single issue work (such as opposing GMO's, gun control, militarization, compulsory vaccination, etc.) in a way that we can confront corporate control on a powerful single front: people’s constitutional rights....

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Burlington- Despite a period of bitterly cold temperatures, Vermonters and other New Englanders are keeping the heat turned up on a variety of issues dealing with human rights and climate justice. Arriving in force at the State Capitol; organizers from the Vermont Workers’ Center continued to apply pressure in Montpelier as Governor Shumlin made his annual budget address to a joint session of the Vermont legislature on Wednesday.

In their counter address that preceded Shumlin’s, the red-shirted...

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The gentlemen and ladies of the meme-o-sphere, where collective notions are birthed like sleet from clouds, have decided lately that the USA has entered a full-on broad-based bull market - a condition of general happiness and prosperity as far advanced beyond mere "recovery" as a wedge of triple-cream Saint-Andre cheese is advanced over a Cheez Doodle. It has become the master fantasy of the moment, following the birth of some junior memes such as... we have a hundred years of shale gas and the "housing sector" (i.e. the suburban sprawl-building industry) is "bouncing back." What a sad-...

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Conservatives have a legitimate gripe about America's excessive "commitments and obligations" to "unfunded liabilities" but their focus on Medicare and social security misses the larger pointour disastrous commitment to the current national lifestyle, in particular suburban sprawl and everything it entails.

     This point came across vividly in a video recently released by the usually level-headed David McAlvaney titled "THE FUSE IS LIT PART 3 - AN AMERICAN RECKONING." In it, the smooth and articulate McAlvaney is...
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Following continent demonstrations in support of the "Idle No More" movement, Vermont Citizens and activists gathered in Montpelier on Saturday afternoon to pledge their solidarity with the rapidly growing movement of indigenous people in Canada.

Responding to Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper's move to advance omnibus bill C-45 that many consider an attempt to strip First Nations, Inuit, and Metis of their tribal rights; the Idle No More marks yet another re-invigoration of dissent against Canadian government leaders.

Friday marked the one-...

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When World War I broke out in August 1914, economists on both sides forecast that hostilities could not last more than about six months. Wars had grown so expensive that governments quickly would run out of money. It seemed that if Germany could not defeat France by springtime, the Allied and Central Powers would run out of savings and reach what today is called a fiscal cliff and be forced to negotiate a peace agreement.

But the Great War dragged on for four destructive years. European governments did what the United States had done after the Civil War broke out in 1861 when the Treasury printed greenbacks. They paid for...

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The story behind the "fiscal cliff" melodrama and the much-memed handwringing about the "good-for-nothing congress" is probably not quite what it appears -- a set of problems that will eventually be overcome by "better leadership" armed with "solutions." The story is really about the permanent disabling of government at this scale and at this level of complexity. In other words, the federal government will never solve its obvious problems of mismanagement and bankruptcy and is now only in business to pretend that it can discharge its obligations (while employees enjoy the perqs). It's just another form of show business....
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